Three Colours: Blue Review/ Analysis

★★★★★

A complex and layered depiction of grief following a shattering tragedy forms an intelligent and strangely optimistic story of a woman who reacts unpredictably in the face of adversity. Orchestral music, unconventional editing and intrusive hues of blue stylishly draw attention to the mindset of a reclusive widowContinue reading “Three Colours: Blue Review/ Analysis”

My Two Favourite Films

Welcome to my new blog! I am a 19 year old A-Level film student based in the UK, hoping to study film at university in the near future. I went through the majority of my youth oblivious to the power of cinema, watching the occasional film as light entertainment without discovering how much more a film can be and do. My love for film was ignited little under 9 months ago as I discovered resources such as Mubi and Sight & Sound, leading to me seeing film under new light and taking up Film Studies at college. Since then I have tried to watch as many films as possible and have been writing reviews on the fantastic film-based social network, Letterboxd. This blog is a new place for me to share my reviews as well as features and articles on various film-related topics, and document my film-watching progression, as their is still so much classic cinema that I need to educate myself on. I also want to use this blog to practise my analytical and writing skills in the hopes of a future career in film journalism, criticism, or something similar.

On this blog each week will be reviews of films old and new, and features and articles about various film- related topics. To kick off the blog, I thought I would present my two favourite films and explain why I love them.

Annie Hall (Woody Allen, 1977)

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Probably the funniest rom-com of all time, Woody Allen and Diane Keaton star as iconic couple Alvy Singer and the titular Annie Hall, and we see the rise, fall, highs and lows of their passionate and tumultuous relationship. Alvy is a stand in for Allen himself, expressing pessimism toward death, ageing, sex and society, and his self-loathing and insecurity play a part in his failed relationship with Annie. Allen and Keaton are both hilarious, and have great on-screen chemistry due to Allen’s screenplay, as well as their off-screen friendship and former relationship. Upon first viewing, I hadn’t realised how much of an impact the film had on me until about a week later. I watched it again, and it is now my go-to comfort film, endlessly watchable and hysterical.

Mulholland Drive (David Lynch, 2001)

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Of all the films that have a strong impact on me, Lynch’s are certainly some of the most prominent. His best in my opinion is Mulholland Drive, a hazy, dream-induced puzzle that walks a tightrope between reality and nightmare. Like all of Lynch’s work, this ambiguous and hallucinatory experience plays with illusion and audience expectation to shock, confuse, and terrify. Coming out of the film with very little idea as to what I had seen, I still felt a sense of satisfaction and fulfillment with what was presented to me despite not understanding it. Interpretations have developed over time, but certain images and scenes in the film hit on such a gut level, that an understanding of events is not necessary, feeling profound emotional impact and unsettling tension regardless. A film that I will wrestle with for years to come.

I would not like to choose between these two films, but they are certainly the two that stick out the most for me, and that cross my mind the most often. I would love to hear what other people think about Annie Hall and Mulholland Drive, and what their own favourites are, so feel free to leave feedback. Thank you for reading and I hope you enjoy my blog!

Feel free to follow on Twitter at @ethan_kruger or check out my Letterboxd profile here.